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Force Domain Controller Removal Steps [VERIFIED]


A domain controller must have connectivity to other domain controllers in the domain in order to demote the domain controller and successfully remove Active Directory Domain Services. If a domain controller has no connectivity to other domain controllers, the standard removal process will fail, and you will need to connect the domain controller to the domain and then restart the removal process. In a limited number of situations, however, you might not want or be able to connect the domain controller to the domain and instead might want to force the removal of the domain controller.




Force Domain Controller Removal Steps



If the domain controller hosts any operations master roles, is a DNS server, or is a global catalog server, warnings similar to the one shown in Figure 3-14 are displayed to explain how the forced removal of the related function will affect the rest of the environment. After you review the recommendations and take appropriate actions (if possible), click Yes to continue.


When you force the removal of a disconnected domain controller, the Active Directory forest metadata is not updated automatically as it is when a domain controller is removed normally. Because of this, you must manually update the forest metadata after you remove the domain controller.


On domain controllers that are running Windows Server 2008, you can use Active Directory Users and Computers to clean up server metadata. Deleting the computer object in the Domain Controllers organizational unit (OU) initiates the cleanup process, and all related tasks are performed automatically. Using Active Directory Users and Computers, you can clean up metadata by completing the following steps:


On domain controllers that are running Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 1 (SP1), Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 2 (SP2), Windows Server 2003 R2, or Windows Server 2008, you also can perform metadata cleanup by using the Ntdsutil command-line tool. Using Ntdsutil, you can clean up server metadata by completing the following steps:


Unauthenticated attackers abuse CVE-2022-26925 to force domain controllers to authenticate them remotely via the Windows NT LAN Manager (NTLM) security protocol and, likely, gain control over the entire Windows domain.


i) As a Domain Admin and in a command prompt type dcpromo /forceremovalii) If the force removal did not work pull the plug ( or shut down properly) and never every turn it back on while connected to the network


This security update addresses the vulnerability by enforcing secure RPC when using the Netlogon secure channel in a phased release explained in the Timing of updates to address Netlogon vulnerability CVE-2020-1472 section. To provide AD forest protection, all DCs, must be updated since they will enforce secure RPC with Netlogon secure channel. This includes read-only domain controllers (RODC).


Vulnerable If a non-compliant DC cannot support secure RPC with Netlogon secure channel before the DCs are in enforcement mode, add the DC using the "Domain controller: Allow vulnerable Netlogon secure channel connections" group policy described below.


Vulnerable If a non-compliant device cannot support secure RPC with Netlogon secure channel before DCs are in enforcement mode, add the device using the "Domain controller: Allow vulnerable Netlogon secure channel connections" group policy described below.


Deploying updates released February 9, 2021 or later will turn on DC enforcement mode. DC enforcement mode is when all Netlogon connections are either required to use secure RPC or the account must have been added to the "Domain controller: Allow vulnerable Netlogon secure channel connections" group policy. At this time, the FullSecureChannelProtection registry key is no longer needed and will no longer be supported.


Active Directory machine accounts for domain joined third-party devices are not protected until enforcement mode is deployed. Machine accounts are also not protected if they are added to the "Domain controller: Allow vulnerable Netlogon secure channel connections" group policy.


Enable enforcement mode to deny vulnerable connections from non-compliant third-party device identities. Note With enforcement mode enabled, any third-party device identities which have been added to the "Domain controller: Allow vulnerable Netlogon secure channel connections" group policy will still be vulnerable and could allow an attacker unauthorized access to your network or devices.


Enforcement mode tells the domain controllers to not allow Netlogon connections from devices that do not use secure RPC unless those device account have been added to "Domain controller: Allow vulnerable Netlogon secure channel connections" group policy.


Enforcement mode should be enabled as soon as possible. Any third-party device will need to be addressed either by making them compliant or by adding them to "Domain controller: Allow vulnerable Netlogon secure channel connections" group policy. Note Any device in the allow list will be allowed to use vulnerable connections and could expose your environment to the attack.


Phase starting with the February 9, 2021 updates where enforcement mode will be enabled on all Windows Domain Controllers, regardless of the registry setting. DCs will deny vulnerable connections from all non-compliant devices, unless they are added to the "Domain controller: Allow vulnerable Netlogon secure channel connections" group policy.


To remove a domain controller it must have connectivity to other domain controllers in the domain in order to demote and successfully remove Active Directory Domain Services. If a domain controller has no connectivity to other domain controllers, the standard removal process will fail, you will need to connect the domain controller to the domain and then restart the removal process. In some rare situations, you might not want or can not connect the domain controller to the domain and instead want to force a removal.


1. Click Start, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run As Administratorto open an elevated command prompt.2. At the command prompt, enter the following command: dcpromo/forceremoval. This starts the Active Directory Domain Services InstallationWizard in Force Removal mode.3. If the domain controller hosts any operations master roles, is a DNS server, or is a global catalog server,a warning are displayed to explain how the forced removal of the related function will affect the rest of the environment. click Yes.4. The Active Directory Domain Services Installation Wizard starts.Click Next.5. On the Force The Removal Of Active Directory Domain Services page, review the information and then click Next.6. If the domain controller is a DNS server with zones integrated with Active Directory, you see a warning stating one or more Active Directory integratedzones will be deleted. Before continuing by clicking OK, you should ensure that there is another DNS server for these zones. Also note that you needto manually remove DNS delegations pointing to this server.7. On the Administrator Password page, you are prompted to type and confirm the password for the local Administrator account on the server. The local Administrator account will be recreated as part of the Active Directory removal process. Click Next.8. On the Summary page, review your selections. If you like Click Export Settings to save these settings to an answer file that you can use to performunattended forced removal of other domain controllers. 9. On the Completing The Active Directory Domain Services Installation Wizard page, click Finish. Do not select the Reboot On Completion check box. Whenyou are prompted to restart the server,wait with this.First examine the server and perform any necessary additional tasks. When it looks ok, restart the server in normal mode.


When you force the removal of a disconnected domain controller, the Active Directory forest metadata is not updated automatically as it is when a domain controller is removed normally. Because of this, you must manually update the forest metadata after you remove the domain controller.You perform metadata cleanup on a domain controller in the domain of the domain controller that you forcibly removed.


Perhaps the most well-known treaty, the Treaty of New Echota, ratified in 1836, called for the removal of the Cherokees living in Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Alabama. The treaty was opposed by many members of the Cherokee Nation; and when they refused to leave, Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott was ordered to push them out. He was given 3,000 troops and the authority to raise additional state militia and volunteer troops to force removal. 350c69d7ab


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